Executioner.
Executioner live in warsawa poland but he is from spain.
Executioner.
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untrustyou:

Andrew Tomayko 
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woutervandevoorde:

Truck stop SA
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oranbeg:




Oranbeg Inquires: Andrew P. Frost 
 

Where are you from/where are you currently residing? 
 
Let’s see—I’m not really from anywhere; my father was in the Navy, so I moved a lot growing up—eighteen times before I was fifteen. I was born in Japan, but went to high school and college in East Tennessee. Currently, I’m living in Teaneck, New Jersey. 



 
What is the work you are currently focusing on? 
 
I’m in the middle of a number of things right now—I just finished a book of my Northeast Kingdom work, I’m trying to finish a project about this ship my father was on, the USS Iowa, and I’m at the infancy of a new project, but I’m still pretty unsure about where it is going. 




 
What is your opinion on the current state of photography, particularly on the photobook? 
 
I go back and forth on this—some days I feel like there is so much good work and so many great things happening, and other days I think it’s all lousy. In my day job, as the printer at Conveyor Arts, I see a lot of photobooks—some of them are really good and really exciting, and others are amazingly depressing. 
The great thing about the accessibility of publishing is that it’s easier than ever to make a book. This, however, is also its greatest flaw—the only obstacle to making a book is money. That said, I think now is the time to be making photographs. 



 
Favorite Photo Blog? 
 
The Great Leap Sideways and Collector Daily—I think there is far too little smart conversation/criticism of photography, and these two blogs do a great job at exactly that. 
 
Favorite Photobook? 
My favorite photobook would have to be The Broken Manual by Alec Soth and Lester B. Morrison. It’s one of the most complex and fantastic books I’ve spent time with. 

Honorary mentions would have to go out to Mark Steinmetz's trilogy (South Central, South East, and Greater Atlanta), and Andrea Modica’s Treadwell.  


Oranbeg Inquires is a series of informal interviews with the artists that have participated in Oranbeg’s Interleaves, Books and the NET exhibitions. Andrew was in Beta & Interleaves

Send in a submission for NET 11 The Poetic Narrative deadline is 11/11/14 at 11:59pm. Also check all our previous NET shows and our recently released annual. 
oranbeg:




Oranbeg Inquires: Andrew P. Frost 
 

Where are you from/where are you currently residing? 
 
Let’s see—I’m not really from anywhere; my father was in the Navy, so I moved a lot growing up—eighteen times before I was fifteen. I was born in Japan, but went to high school and college in East Tennessee. Currently, I’m living in Teaneck, New Jersey. 



 
What is the work you are currently focusing on? 
 
I’m in the middle of a number of things right now—I just finished a book of my Northeast Kingdom work, I’m trying to finish a project about this ship my father was on, the USS Iowa, and I’m at the infancy of a new project, but I’m still pretty unsure about where it is going. 




 
What is your opinion on the current state of photography, particularly on the photobook? 
 
I go back and forth on this—some days I feel like there is so much good work and so many great things happening, and other days I think it’s all lousy. In my day job, as the printer at Conveyor Arts, I see a lot of photobooks—some of them are really good and really exciting, and others are amazingly depressing. 
The great thing about the accessibility of publishing is that it’s easier than ever to make a book. This, however, is also its greatest flaw—the only obstacle to making a book is money. That said, I think now is the time to be making photographs. 



 
Favorite Photo Blog? 
 
The Great Leap Sideways and Collector Daily—I think there is far too little smart conversation/criticism of photography, and these two blogs do a great job at exactly that. 
 
Favorite Photobook? 
My favorite photobook would have to be The Broken Manual by Alec Soth and Lester B. Morrison. It’s one of the most complex and fantastic books I’ve spent time with. 

Honorary mentions would have to go out to Mark Steinmetz's trilogy (South Central, South East, and Greater Atlanta), and Andrea Modica’s Treadwell.  


Oranbeg Inquires is a series of informal interviews with the artists that have participated in Oranbeg’s Interleaves, Books and the NET exhibitions. Andrew was in Beta & Interleaves

Send in a submission for NET 11 The Poetic Narrative deadline is 11/11/14 at 11:59pm. Also check all our previous NET shows and our recently released annual. 
oranbeg:




Oranbeg Inquires: Andrew P. Frost 
 

Where are you from/where are you currently residing? 
 
Let’s see—I’m not really from anywhere; my father was in the Navy, so I moved a lot growing up—eighteen times before I was fifteen. I was born in Japan, but went to high school and college in East Tennessee. Currently, I’m living in Teaneck, New Jersey. 



 
What is the work you are currently focusing on? 
 
I’m in the middle of a number of things right now—I just finished a book of my Northeast Kingdom work, I’m trying to finish a project about this ship my father was on, the USS Iowa, and I’m at the infancy of a new project, but I’m still pretty unsure about where it is going. 




 
What is your opinion on the current state of photography, particularly on the photobook? 
 
I go back and forth on this—some days I feel like there is so much good work and so many great things happening, and other days I think it’s all lousy. In my day job, as the printer at Conveyor Arts, I see a lot of photobooks—some of them are really good and really exciting, and others are amazingly depressing. 
The great thing about the accessibility of publishing is that it’s easier than ever to make a book. This, however, is also its greatest flaw—the only obstacle to making a book is money. That said, I think now is the time to be making photographs. 



 
Favorite Photo Blog? 
 
The Great Leap Sideways and Collector Daily—I think there is far too little smart conversation/criticism of photography, and these two blogs do a great job at exactly that. 
 
Favorite Photobook? 
My favorite photobook would have to be The Broken Manual by Alec Soth and Lester B. Morrison. It’s one of the most complex and fantastic books I’ve spent time with. 

Honorary mentions would have to go out to Mark Steinmetz's trilogy (South Central, South East, and Greater Atlanta), and Andrea Modica’s Treadwell.  


Oranbeg Inquires is a series of informal interviews with the artists that have participated in Oranbeg’s Interleaves, Books and the NET exhibitions. Andrew was in Beta & Interleaves

Send in a submission for NET 11 The Poetic Narrative deadline is 11/11/14 at 11:59pm. Also check all our previous NET shows and our recently released annual. 
oranbeg:




Oranbeg Inquires: Andrew P. Frost 
 

Where are you from/where are you currently residing? 
 
Let’s see—I’m not really from anywhere; my father was in the Navy, so I moved a lot growing up—eighteen times before I was fifteen. I was born in Japan, but went to high school and college in East Tennessee. Currently, I’m living in Teaneck, New Jersey. 



 
What is the work you are currently focusing on? 
 
I’m in the middle of a number of things right now—I just finished a book of my Northeast Kingdom work, I’m trying to finish a project about this ship my father was on, the USS Iowa, and I’m at the infancy of a new project, but I’m still pretty unsure about where it is going. 




 
What is your opinion on the current state of photography, particularly on the photobook? 
 
I go back and forth on this—some days I feel like there is so much good work and so many great things happening, and other days I think it’s all lousy. In my day job, as the printer at Conveyor Arts, I see a lot of photobooks—some of them are really good and really exciting, and others are amazingly depressing. 
The great thing about the accessibility of publishing is that it’s easier than ever to make a book. This, however, is also its greatest flaw—the only obstacle to making a book is money. That said, I think now is the time to be making photographs. 



 
Favorite Photo Blog? 
 
The Great Leap Sideways and Collector Daily—I think there is far too little smart conversation/criticism of photography, and these two blogs do a great job at exactly that. 
 
Favorite Photobook? 
My favorite photobook would have to be The Broken Manual by Alec Soth and Lester B. Morrison. It’s one of the most complex and fantastic books I’ve spent time with. 

Honorary mentions would have to go out to Mark Steinmetz's trilogy (South Central, South East, and Greater Atlanta), and Andrea Modica’s Treadwell.  


Oranbeg Inquires is a series of informal interviews with the artists that have participated in Oranbeg’s Interleaves, Books and the NET exhibitions. Andrew was in Beta & Interleaves

Send in a submission for NET 11 The Poetic Narrative deadline is 11/11/14 at 11:59pm. Also check all our previous NET shows and our recently released annual. 
oranbeg:




Oranbeg Inquires: Andrew P. Frost 
 

Where are you from/where are you currently residing? 
 
Let’s see—I’m not really from anywhere; my father was in the Navy, so I moved a lot growing up—eighteen times before I was fifteen. I was born in Japan, but went to high school and college in East Tennessee. Currently, I’m living in Teaneck, New Jersey. 



 
What is the work you are currently focusing on? 
 
I’m in the middle of a number of things right now—I just finished a book of my Northeast Kingdom work, I’m trying to finish a project about this ship my father was on, the USS Iowa, and I’m at the infancy of a new project, but I’m still pretty unsure about where it is going. 




 
What is your opinion on the current state of photography, particularly on the photobook? 
 
I go back and forth on this—some days I feel like there is so much good work and so many great things happening, and other days I think it’s all lousy. In my day job, as the printer at Conveyor Arts, I see a lot of photobooks—some of them are really good and really exciting, and others are amazingly depressing. 
The great thing about the accessibility of publishing is that it’s easier than ever to make a book. This, however, is also its greatest flaw—the only obstacle to making a book is money. That said, I think now is the time to be making photographs. 



 
Favorite Photo Blog? 
 
The Great Leap Sideways and Collector Daily—I think there is far too little smart conversation/criticism of photography, and these two blogs do a great job at exactly that. 
 
Favorite Photobook? 
My favorite photobook would have to be The Broken Manual by Alec Soth and Lester B. Morrison. It’s one of the most complex and fantastic books I’ve spent time with. 

Honorary mentions would have to go out to Mark Steinmetz's trilogy (South Central, South East, and Greater Atlanta), and Andrea Modica’s Treadwell.  


Oranbeg Inquires is a series of informal interviews with the artists that have participated in Oranbeg’s Interleaves, Books and the NET exhibitions. Andrew was in Beta & Interleaves

Send in a submission for NET 11 The Poetic Narrative deadline is 11/11/14 at 11:59pm. Also check all our previous NET shows and our recently released annual. 
oranbeg:




Oranbeg Inquires: Andrew P. Frost 
 

Where are you from/where are you currently residing? 
 
Let’s see—I’m not really from anywhere; my father was in the Navy, so I moved a lot growing up—eighteen times before I was fifteen. I was born in Japan, but went to high school and college in East Tennessee. Currently, I’m living in Teaneck, New Jersey. 



 
What is the work you are currently focusing on? 
 
I’m in the middle of a number of things right now—I just finished a book of my Northeast Kingdom work, I’m trying to finish a project about this ship my father was on, the USS Iowa, and I’m at the infancy of a new project, but I’m still pretty unsure about where it is going. 




 
What is your opinion on the current state of photography, particularly on the photobook? 
 
I go back and forth on this—some days I feel like there is so much good work and so many great things happening, and other days I think it’s all lousy. In my day job, as the printer at Conveyor Arts, I see a lot of photobooks—some of them are really good and really exciting, and others are amazingly depressing. 
The great thing about the accessibility of publishing is that it’s easier than ever to make a book. This, however, is also its greatest flaw—the only obstacle to making a book is money. That said, I think now is the time to be making photographs. 



 
Favorite Photo Blog? 
 
The Great Leap Sideways and Collector Daily—I think there is far too little smart conversation/criticism of photography, and these two blogs do a great job at exactly that. 
 
Favorite Photobook? 
My favorite photobook would have to be The Broken Manual by Alec Soth and Lester B. Morrison. It’s one of the most complex and fantastic books I’ve spent time with. 

Honorary mentions would have to go out to Mark Steinmetz's trilogy (South Central, South East, and Greater Atlanta), and Andrea Modica’s Treadwell.  


Oranbeg Inquires is a series of informal interviews with the artists that have participated in Oranbeg’s Interleaves, Books and the NET exhibitions. Andrew was in Beta & Interleaves

Send in a submission for NET 11 The Poetic Narrative deadline is 11/11/14 at 11:59pm. Also check all our previous NET shows and our recently released annual. 
oranbeg:




Oranbeg Inquires: Andrew P. Frost 
 

Where are you from/where are you currently residing? 
 
Let’s see—I’m not really from anywhere; my father was in the Navy, so I moved a lot growing up—eighteen times before I was fifteen. I was born in Japan, but went to high school and college in East Tennessee. Currently, I’m living in Teaneck, New Jersey. 



 
What is the work you are currently focusing on? 
 
I’m in the middle of a number of things right now—I just finished a book of my Northeast Kingdom work, I’m trying to finish a project about this ship my father was on, the USS Iowa, and I’m at the infancy of a new project, but I’m still pretty unsure about where it is going. 




 
What is your opinion on the current state of photography, particularly on the photobook? 
 
I go back and forth on this—some days I feel like there is so much good work and so many great things happening, and other days I think it’s all lousy. In my day job, as the printer at Conveyor Arts, I see a lot of photobooks—some of them are really good and really exciting, and others are amazingly depressing. 
The great thing about the accessibility of publishing is that it’s easier than ever to make a book. This, however, is also its greatest flaw—the only obstacle to making a book is money. That said, I think now is the time to be making photographs. 



 
Favorite Photo Blog? 
 
The Great Leap Sideways and Collector Daily—I think there is far too little smart conversation/criticism of photography, and these two blogs do a great job at exactly that. 
 
Favorite Photobook? 
My favorite photobook would have to be The Broken Manual by Alec Soth and Lester B. Morrison. It’s one of the most complex and fantastic books I’ve spent time with. 

Honorary mentions would have to go out to Mark Steinmetz's trilogy (South Central, South East, and Greater Atlanta), and Andrea Modica’s Treadwell.  


Oranbeg Inquires is a series of informal interviews with the artists that have participated in Oranbeg’s Interleaves, Books and the NET exhibitions. Andrew was in Beta & Interleaves

Send in a submission for NET 11 The Poetic Narrative deadline is 11/11/14 at 11:59pm. Also check all our previous NET shows and our recently released annual. 
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nhmcelroy:

Ahndraya Parlato and Gregory Halpern, from East of the Sun, West of the Moon: 
"These photographs were made on the Solstices and Equinoxes of 2012 and 2013. They were made wherever we happened to be—our home, travelling, or wherever we found ourselves on those four days of the year.
While photographing, we thought loosely about time, about what time looks like to each of us—time of day, time of year, time in the sense of a lifespan. Not surprisingly, certain themes recurred—birth and death, transition and renewal, lightness and darkness.
The title is borrowed from a Norwegian folk tale. We liked the idea of trying to rely on two continually shifting landmarks as navigational guides, how disorienting that idea is, and how it creates an elusive or impossible place.”
nhmcelroy:

Ahndraya Parlato and Gregory Halpern, from East of the Sun, West of the Moon: 
"These photographs were made on the Solstices and Equinoxes of 2012 and 2013. They were made wherever we happened to be—our home, travelling, or wherever we found ourselves on those four days of the year.
While photographing, we thought loosely about time, about what time looks like to each of us—time of day, time of year, time in the sense of a lifespan. Not surprisingly, certain themes recurred—birth and death, transition and renewal, lightness and darkness.
The title is borrowed from a Norwegian folk tale. We liked the idea of trying to rely on two continually shifting landmarks as navigational guides, how disorienting that idea is, and how it creates an elusive or impossible place.”
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scavengedluxury:

The one who rests rusts. Leeds, October 2014.